2017-2018 Weddell Seals -- Flying Penguins and birds in the burgs!


#1

Flying Penguins :upside_down_face: …rocket propelled :sweat_smile:


2017-2018 Weddel Seals - Mawson & Davis Adare Seas - POI and Fun Finds
#2

Maybe chimney swifts? I’ve seen videos of them flying around in “swarms” instead of flocks. Pretty aerobatic they are - and like you said, millions of them.


#3

Well, chimney swifts are found in North America, right – so it isn’t likely what Em saw.


#4

Starlings? I saw a great video on these last year!


#5

You’re right. I can’t remember what bird video I saw with thousands of bird flying around and just nose-diving down into a chimney. I thought it was in the UK, but that was quite a while ago that I saw it. Now that I think of it, there is a asphalt plant just over the town line where they keep a mountain of sand - as well as several of different sizes of stone. I did see that the “sunny side” of the sand pile was filled with small holes and every so often I would see birds entering and exiting them. That dug nesting holes and built their nests inside. The front-end loader would leave that side of the pile alone and only take sand from the other three sides so as not to disturb the birds. Nice man!
Here is a link to chimney swifts on Wikipedia. Check out the “Behavior” part of the article. These birds “bathe” on the fly. Interesting!
Chimney swift


#6

I know they were definitely not starlings, I recognise their flight formations and what I saw were just masses of birds flying straight in a north-south direction. None came low enough to identify with the naked eye, so just looked black against the sky, and they certainly weren’t geese.

I remember once years ago moored up on the Norfolk Broads huge flocks of geese flew in, landing on the river we were moored on; there were hundreds of them surrounding us. The water was absolutely covered in geese from bank to bank in front and behind us. The noise was immense as they swam on into the lake and dispersed from there to I don’t know where because by the time we sailed out into the lake they were gone, as though it had never happened. :smiley:


#7

For those so inclined there is a great app called iBird Pro. Not free, but very comprehensive including bird calls.
There are different versions including one for Great Britain and one for Canada. :eagle::duck::owl::dove::penguin:


#8

Shucks…Here Whopping cranes, Sandhill cranes travel so high up that you can only see a speck of them, They migrate from the north to Texas and Arkansas. You cannot identify them from the ground, but you will hear them calling for miles before you even see the massive flock go over. I travelled last year to see the whopping cranes who land in our province during their migration. They can be 3-6 feet tall and have a wing span of 7 feet. You have a similar crane to the Sandhill Crane…the Grey Crane that migrates in May and June and back again in the fall…a possibility. That’s all my guesses!


#9

Oh good idea I will look into that. Thanks!