2018 - Indonesia earthquakes, tsunami, flash flooding


#21

#22

It’s like the US response to New Orleans years ago.

The Indonesian military is stretched too thin. The disaster covers the NORTH and CENTRAL areas.

Military transport is overwhelmed by people trying to get out AND volunteers trying to get IN. They are in crisis mode, with no definitive plan for what to do.

With all the twisted metal, and people barefoot or in flimsy sandals, and moving debris with bare hands, tetanus is a huge risk.

Locals are trying to bury the dead to prevent diseases, especially because the bodies are wet and that can spread cholera through ground water where deceased lay. They’re digging mass graves.

In the meantime, able-bodied people are looting, which puts the young, the elderly, the infirm, the disabled at higher risk of disease and death.

For everyone, the lack of CLEAN water for drinking and wound treatment is a huge problem.

Overall, what a bad situation. They must set up command centers and radio to try to coordinate some relief efforts.

Where do you start though? It’s like pick an area and just start— what an overwhelming crisis.

Don’t breathe in ash and heated sand//glass partiicles. Don’t step on anything. Don’t drink the water. Be careful where you choose to defecate and urinate (never controlled in a crisis like this) because it will end up in drinking water, even if that water is in a rut where someone gives into their thirst. Stay away from the dead. Wear masks (they have none). Wear gloves (have none). Wear boots (have none). Etc. Etc. Etc.

Sigh… .


#23

This is from the earthquake…


#24

I am fascinated and horrified by soil liquefaction, which occurred in Washington State some years back when a whole hillside sheered off and traveled over a mile on liquefacted soil, burying houses and people under feet of mud.

Soil liquefaction is like putting dishsoap atop a plastic container and moving a second container across it – a quick slide with little resistance.

Even huge boulders can ride upon the mud. Those poor people. I think the video said 750 lived there.

https://geology.com/usgs/liquefaction/ [Shoot, gotta scroll halfway down the page before you see the content.]


#25

It was 750 homes that were destroyed. :frowning_face:


#26

Ah I knew I heard that number.


#27

#28

#29

The Crisis map in Palu:

http://google.org/crisismap/google.com/2018-palu-tsunami

The toll has now reached 1649.


#30

#31

#32

I hope there is a response for data for this area…


#33

#34

That’s the original video from another cellphone videographer. They were all in a car parking deck. People up there were screaming to people on the street to run, to get to higher ground. No warning had sounded for the tsunami. Many people ran or biked away but the wave caught too many. Motorbikes were shown piled in the streets. :frowning: Harrowing and simply tragic.


#35

#36

Another earthquake


#37

#38

#39

I hope we get to help out in a campaign here. Have DigitalGlobe gathered post-event imagery? I realize the acute search and rescue is over, but Tomnod could still be of use in tagging damage.
@Mel_Nod :smiley:


#40

I agree, so much devastation. We could do a campaign similar to H. Maria?