2018 July to Dec - Bird & Animal Sightings


#101

now this would be scary…


#102

#103

#104

The trumpeter swans and snow geese have landed. :swan: this will be continual through to October. Cranes, Canada geese, snow geese, swans, cormorants, whoopers, etc.

EDIT: Out to an area of Greenhouses, turf places, market gardens and the Sandhill Cranes have taken over the fields!!! Amazing…Monday / Tuesday will take out my tripod and just set up in a field!!!

And along the South Saskatchewan River, the sandhill cranes are playing on the sandbars!!!


#105

There were 24 fledglings in the Wood Buffalo National Park (Alberta) Whopping Crane Count. Their migration south will start in the next few weeks. Hopefully the peak Atlantic hurricane season is over when they are migrating south to Arkansas and Texas.


#106

The Snow geese, swans, cormorants, canada geese, started their migration from north of us several weeks ago, which is early. They will stay here unless the weather turns and then go further south. This interactive map gives you an idea of how far some of the birds go south.


#107

#108

I believe I had spoken about out “Grandpa” bluejay before - the old fat one. Yesterday my wife and I we sitting on our porch (we had last night and yesterday off from babysitting (withdrawal symptoms coming on :laughing:)). My wife looked around the corner and spotted him sitting all hunched up on the porch railing at the far end. We didn’t think anything of it and my wife just told him how beautiful he was. Later on I spotted him sitting in the French lilac tree - again didn’t pay him much mind. I figured he was just waiting for some peanuts. About an hour or so later my wife called me outside. She pointed down by the trash and recycling barrels by my workshop. There lay “Grandpa” on his chest. I guess he finally succumbed to old age. :frowning_face: I got him buried next to our parrot before the rain started. Gonna miss that old guy.


#109

that’s too bad. …we have lots of them this time of year. some people do not like their call or they are always looking for peanuts. They love that coil hanger for peanuts. You can make one out of a wire hanger and a slinky!!!


#110

They actually make a lot of different calls - some are quite beautiful! My wife and I heard a strange, but beautiful bird call and were trying to see what kind of bird was in the tree. Finally it showed itself - a bluejay! They can also imitate the call of a red-shoulder hawk (they like to hunt from a tall tree instead of soaring around), as well as many other birds. I guess they’re “copy cats.” Would you believe the other day we watched a parent bluejay still being nagged by one of its offspring to feed it? When the parent would grab a peanut, the youngster would fly over, crouch down and hold one wing out and flap it as it made the “feed me” cry. The parent flew up into the pine tree closely followed by the mooching youngster. The parent continued to fly from tree to tree - followed by the “I don’t want to feed myself” bird. Finally the parent flew off out of sight. It took the young bird a minute before it realized, “Hey! She’s not coming back!” Then it too flew off.

The stink bug invasion is starting to pick up. I killed almost a dozen already today just in the screen room. And each time I start to come inside, I see another one or two fly in and land on the screen. Haven’t seen any ladybugs on the outside walls of the house yet. Getting deeply concerned their numbers are dwindling.

The hummingbirds are still around. They should be getting ready to head south this month. I wonder if they know there’s a hurricane in their flyway and are going to hang around a bit longer. Either way, I emptied, cleaned and refilled the feeders with fresh and strong nectar. I always make the nectar extra strong in the spring and fall.


#111

I always wish they could stay longer. They are only here from late May until end of August - September long weekend - and then they are gone. I’ve seen several nest and babies, but would love to see them more. Maybe once I move to a warmer climate area!!!


#112

This is from June, 2018 but they confirm ladybugs are dwindling in numbers.


#113

Oooohhh… You’ll miss the snow! :hushed:


#114

Thanks for that article link. I’m reading it at the moment. I’m also going to check out that Ladybug Project at the website given in the article. :smiley:


#115

I can visit the snow anytime…for short periods.


#116

I didn’t realize that it was so late in the year for the ladybugs to congregate on the sides of houses (mid- to end of October) . Since I retired in 1998 I haven’t worn a wrist watch and I really do pay any mind as to what day of the week - or for that matter, what week - it is. Even though they arrive every year, I’ve paid much mind as to when they showed up. I’ll have to pay more close attention in the future. :thinking:


#117

We will see them for a little bit more in September, of course, dependent on how cold it gets during the night.
In the spring, ladybugs are one of the first things we see when it warms up!


#118

I travelled yesterday and the skies are covered with flocks of “V” shaped Canada geese and Snow geese that are landing in the combined fields to feed on the leftovers. They will be here for a few weeks before they move on to the next part of their journey.


#119

Good to know…

https://www.npr.org/2018/09/13/647464963/migrating-birds-avoid-bad-weather-which-makes-their-paths-predictable


#120

I hope you are able to open this video. It is a stunning video done in our area by Ducks Unlimited of the sandhill cranes in our area.