2018 - Snow Falling


#1

As the weather patterns change around the world…here too…we are having some unusual weather:

Several areas through Alberta and on to Saskatchewan have warnings for a snowstorm, 10-15 cm (6 inches) of heavy wet snow will fall Wed and Thursday. This is very early for this type of snowfall and I hope it is not an indication of what is to come this winter.

https://weather.gc.ca/warnings/report_e.html?ab33


#2

#3

Eeek, that’s a bit early…:scream::snowflake:
I want to see some snow in October, but that’s a different matter, I’ll be travelling north to see it. Don’t want it this far south…


#4

No doubt you will!!!


#5

Actually, as much as I love snow, I don’t want to see it until after the leaves are off the trees. (Snap, crack, crash!)


#6

This is a real possibility with this type of heavy wet snow. Trees and power lines come down.


#7

Went through that. Entire town declared an emergency disaster. Looked like a war zone. Nearly 3 days to get 6 miles. Cut/push trees off road with 4-way plow… cut wires (power, telephone, cable) so they didn’t pull boards off of houses as we pushed the trees off the roads, etc… Some people without power for weeks. Woods still look like a hurricane went through in some areas. And this was about 25+ years ago!


#8

Most of our cable and telephone are buried in the city and towns and even power in newer areas…however in the country is totally different.
Usually all extra power personnel from around the province will head to the storm area to help restore the power as quickly as possible. (Like they are heading to South Carolina right now) I only remember power being out in remote areas for a week.


#9

Our local family-owned telephone company buried their phone lines in the rural areas 30 years ago. Electric on the other hand is above ground - save for a few new housing developments and those property owners who pay to have their service lines buried from the road to their houses. (My son did that.) All cable TV is aerial. One of the problems around here is that in many places, the bedrock is very close to the surface - even jutting above ground. We are living on ancient worn down mountains. :wink: There was one occasion when I broke a “buried” telephone line running across a ditch next to a culvert pipe. The pipe was laid on bedrock and the phone company laid their line on the rock in front of it. All that was covering it was leaves. :rofl: A crew was working over on the next road with an excavator using a hydraulic hammer (think "jack hammer/air hammer). They came over and cut a trench for the phone line and lined it with sand. The phone company did the finishing up work (splicing, laying and burying the repaired line). Wouldn’t you know that the house this went to had an occupant that was on life support and used the phone line as a direct link to the hospital? I never saw a repair go so quickly. :wink:


#10

The powerline techs work under extreme conditions to get power restored…whether a thunderstorm, a snowstorm, an ice storm, a hurricane…they will be out there trying to pick up lines and restore power to everyone in the area. (Of course at -40 C there is added pressure to get power going so the heat can be restored).


#11

:laughing: There was a water main break tonight on Main Street in the village. Just as the crew got the road opened up - and very deep - several rain showers and 2 thunderstorms have come through so far! Talk about getting wet! :frowning_face:

Edit: Update at 11:26 PM. We got our water back on a little while ago. The crew made quick work of opening the road, digging down 9-10 feet/3 metres, pumping the water out of the hole, removing the damaged section of the main, installing the new section, pressure testing it, covering it, filling in the hole, and putting down stone on top (for now). And all this while it was raining and with a passing thunderstorm. These guys are good! Only about 3-1/4 hours. :smiley:


#12

#13

I’ve driven the Coquihalla in winter. Gotta have rocks in the head to drive up there. I was petrified the whole way. You guys have my deepest sympathy.


#14

#15

We are now forecast for sleet/snow on Saturday.


#16

You all must have said something bad to the weather gods to tic them off this fall. Usually higher elevations get much earlier snow. I have seen 7 feet of snow on the ground in Yellowstone NP on the 6th of June back in the eighties.


#17

We used to get some good weather back then, didn’t we? They don’t make the seasons like they used to anymore. :smirk:


#18

I feel like we missed a season! All the leaves haven’t even fallen yet!
Sleet/Snow will fall Friday! Scrapers ready!


#19

I hope you don’t get very much. Heavy wet sleet/snow will break tree limbs. :grimacing:


#20

Yes one of the hazards…and power lines going down. By Thanksgiving, which is October 8th for us, we usually have leaves just falling from the trees.