2019 The Poles - Arctic and Antarctic - News, Adventures, Expeditions

#41

@EmeraldEyes and @Thistle, I’ve been looking and looking for the article I wanted to find for you (Ian), but I did come across this article that helps explain why sea levels don’t rise uniformly around the world.

2 Likes
#42
4 Likes
#43
4 Likes
#44

Antarctica from a different perspective…

3 Likes
#45

I’m wondering about freezer burn? ice burn? lol

3 Likes
#46

He’s OK if his freezers pack up! :laughing:

3 Likes
#47

We use that all the time…Xmas baking boxed in the garage… at -35 C nothing is going to thaw!!!

2 Likes
#48

We talked about this once before…ice cores…

3 Likes
#49
1 Like
#50

We had a fascinating programme on TV (BBC) last night which was looking at our changing earth from viewpoints on the ground, in the air, and from satellite! Part of the programme was about the new colonies of Emperor penguins found by tracking the guano stains in the snow… (Yes, @Jim7, while I was watching, I did think of you tagging all of those penguins… :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:)
Credits at the end included Maxar/Digital Globe.

3 Likes
#51

I’m not saying nuthin! :roll_eyes: :grinning:

3 Likes
#52

:sweat_smile::laughing::rofl:
amazing images

3 Likes
#53

Concerning:

3 Likes
#54

I wonder if there’s a common connection with the Emperor Penguins and the whales in the North Atlantic who also seem to be having a breeding problem. Some baby whales are still borne. Something is going on to cause this problem in both hemispheres.

And since we’re in the “2019 The Poles - …” topic, here’s an interesting article about the different types of ice found throughout the world. Very interesting with great descriptions and many photos.

3 Likes
#55

Possibly there is a connection. This article from the Australian division cites climate change.

http://www.antarctica.gov.au/about-antarctica/wildlife/animals/penguins/emperor-penguins

3 Likes
#56

Interesting

3 Likes
#57

Can you imagine a Cat 11 hurricane or cyclone hitting a populated area? Those are some nasty winds! Wow!

3 Likes
#58

I cannot imagine…winds could be anywhere from 102 kph to 180 kph winds (63 to112 mph)…

3 Likes
#59

I think a Cat 11 cyclone would be closer to 180 mph/289 kph or more. The highest wind speeds recorded in Antarctica were at Dumont d’Urville station in July 1972: 327km/h (199 mph). This tends to make it too blustery kite flying. :grinning: (Where do I come up with this stuff? :thinking:)

4 Likes
#60

I looked at a Beaufort Scale…this one even says something different than the last one…

3 Likes